Facial Disfigurement: a study using the virtual world, Second Life

Facial scar on avatar

We found differences among the coping styles identified by participants’ responses on the BICSI and their behaviours in-world. … The discrepancies between the BICSI scores and behaviours in-world suggest future research directions evaluating the longstanding problem of divergent expressed and reported attitudes.

 

This is a first for Ether Books: ‘Facial Disfigurement in Second Life‘ is a research paper detailing a study in which participants responded to the application of a facial scar to their avatar. A free download for smartphones. http://catalog.etherbooks.com/Products/3014

 

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Using Virtual Reality to Provide Health Care Information to People With Intellectual Disabilities

Demo of BP equipment

SL demo of BP equipment

It can take a long time to translate the uphill trek of the funding application into the enervating research you set out to do And afterwards, there seems to be an even longer trail towards placing an academic report of that work in a suitable publication.  The Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR) is about as appropriate a positioning as we could have hoped for, with its focus on best use of technology in the interests of health. As you might expect, JMIR does not confine its publication to dry text, and so there are images drawn from the study, and even a video tour of the virtual environment. We are very pleased to be included.

Hall, V., Conboy-Hill, S., Taylor, D. Using Virtual Reality to Provide Health Care Information to People With Intellectual Disabilities: Acceptability, Usability, and Potential Utility. Journal of Medical Internet Research, Vol 13, No 4 2011. Oct-Dec. http://www.jmir.org/2011/4/e91/  

Val Hall – university of Brighton

Dave Taylor – Imperial College London

Suzanne Conboy-Hill – Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust & university of Brighton

Getting your hands on a virtual frog

Virtual reality uses multimedia content. Appli...

Image via Wikipedia

VR has moved another step forwards with developments at the Computer Vision lab in Zürich. Using a special sensor arm, the operator can touch and feel the projected image of an object while viewing it through data goggles. There are many ways now of using simulation for skill development, task rehearsal, and remote operations. This development adds another layer of reality to the virtual representation and so gives rise to an exponential growth in the potential for health applications.