Down’s Syndrome and Alzheimer’s Dementia

screen clip of research paperIt’s a dreadful double whammy – people with Down’s are much more at risk of developing Alzheimer’s due to the extra strand of chromosome that causes Down’s in the first place.  Better healthcare and support means many more people are living into older age (in the early 1900s, most didn’t survive beyond 12 years), enjoying more life opportunities than ever before – including acting, gigging, (check out Heavy Load – I knew several of them!) and hitting the clubs and festivals  supported by friends, family, and the likes of Gig Buddies and the Stay Up Late campaign.

But the tragedy of dementia lurks and threatens to peel away the thin layer of icing on their newly risen cake.  What a prospect: a newly realised good quality life expectancy with the almost 100% risk of it all ending in such a dreadful mire of memory and personality loss.

So where is the upside? It’s here: with a population so at risk and a clearly identifiable strand of genetic material to look at, there’s the possibility of finely tuned research into the disease and this will benefit all of us.

ALL. OF. US.

Say thank you – to the researchers, to the participants, to the families and support workers.

ALL. OF. US.

Spare some cash for their funds.

ALL. OF. US.

And next time you hear some ignoramus insulting a person with Down’s, call them out. Sometimes being better than that ourselves and feeling uncomfortable about it isn’t quite enough to challenge those insults (you know the ones well enough), but maybe this will give us all a shove in the right direction.

Because did I say ALL. OF. US?

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‘The Recovery Letters’ edited by James Withey

This collection of letters written by people with experience of depression to people still in the thick of it is available now for pre-order. The reviews here strongly suggest without actually saying so, that this isn’t a sit-down-and-read-all-in-one-go sort of book. It isn’t a novel; it’s real and it’s painful at times because the people who wrote the letters and pulled back the curtains on very personal experiences of their own are real. But its message is hope – everyone who wrote has been there and eventually found a safer place from which to speak. The depressions are different and the recoveries are different because the people are different. There’s probably something there for anyone in that black hole and feeling lost although it may not be the first letter, or any of the first several, or the middle one or the last, but it’s likely to be somewhere there just a page-turn away. And it may not be the same one the next time you look because you will have changed.

To my mind, it’s the complementary twin of Matt Haig’s Reasons to Stay Alive, a profoundly moving autobiographical account of his own depression and recovery which can be read like a novel. Have both. Give both. Keep both. On the shelf, by the bed, in the gap between the cushion and the arm of the sofa, Wherever is close to hand.

Elder Care

This list of links comes via Kayla Harris of ElderImpact:

With more and more people joining the ranks of seniors these days, there really can’t be enough information to share. And while the internet has gobs of resources, it can be like finding a needle in a haystack.

At Elderimpact.org, we’re dedicated to helping seniors stay healthy, connected, and up on today’s news and developments. That’s why I’m sharing with you a collection of great resources we put together.

I hope you find them useful and that you will consider sharing them with your readers.

 

The Boomer’s Ultimate Guide to Adding Value to Your Home

9 of the Best Travel Destinations for Seniors and Retirees

Downsizing in Your Senior Years? Decluttering Tips for Seniors

Disaster Safety for People with Disabilities

Healthy Aging Into Your 80s and Beyond

Substance Abuse And Addiction In The Elderly

Caring for Elderly Parents: Managing Role-Reversal


Senior-Friendly Remodeling

Aging Parents And Children Should Talk About Finances

Signs It’s Time for Assisted Living: Identify Potential Warning Signs that It’s Time for a Move

Caretakers’ Guide to Moving Seniors Into a Facility

Checklist: Pre-Planning Your Funeral or Memorial Service

Reasons for Cremation or Burial: Practical and Personal Considerations

Kayla Harris

Elderimpact.org

340 S Lemon Ave #5780

Walnut, CA 91789

A comprehensive list that’s likely to be invaluable to people for whom the care of an elderly person is a central concern, or to elderly people themselves. Be informed, know what you want and what’s out there. Even if the locations of these resources are outside your country, they may prompt you to see if there is anything similar locally – and if not, why not.