Spirit of Enquiry conference, 2011

Spirit of Enquiry flyer imageI am very sorry to report that this conference has been cancelled. This is due to low levels of registration which, in turn, seem likely to be due to our lack of publicity at a key time (I was away and unable to expedite this – see link), and current pressures on clinical staff to meet necessary targets. The Trust is working hard to deliver complex services to a population of around 1.5 million people, and the present climate is not an easy one within which to operate flexibly. Front-line staff probably feel this more than any of us.

Hopefully, we will be back next year. Two guaranteed invitations to present will go to successful submissions from Jo Lee and Corrie Neilson. Jo is a senior physiotherapist with the Brighton & Hove Learning Disability team. Her paper, titled Passive Therapeutic Standing in the Neurologically Impaired Population, is a part of her Master’s dissertation with the University of Brighton, for which she earned a Distinction. Corrie’s paper,  An exploration into Second Life use with a Facially Disfigured Avatar, describes the research component of her Master’s in Foundations of Clinical Psychology & Mental Health from the University of Sussex, for which she too received a Distinction. Corrie has been a volunteer with Trust learning disability services and a care worker for adults with challenging behaviour in community services. She hopes to undertake Doctoral training in clinical psychology.

These are high quality pieces of work delivered by professional/aspirational clinicians at an early stage in their experience as researchers. The future of NHS innovation would seem to be in good hands.

Advertisements

Using Virtual Reality to Provide Health Care Information to People With Intellectual Disabilities

Demo of BP equipment

SL demo of BP equipment

It can take a long time to translate the uphill trek of the funding application into the enervating research you set out to do And afterwards, there seems to be an even longer trail towards placing an academic report of that work in a suitable publication.  The Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR) is about as appropriate a positioning as we could have hoped for, with its focus on best use of technology in the interests of health. As you might expect, JMIR does not confine its publication to dry text, and so there are images drawn from the study, and even a video tour of the virtual environment. We are very pleased to be included.

Hall, V., Conboy-Hill, S., Taylor, D. Using Virtual Reality to Provide Health Care Information to People With Intellectual Disabilities: Acceptability, Usability, and Potential Utility. Journal of Medical Internet Research, Vol 13, No 4 2011. Oct-Dec. http://www.jmir.org/2011/4/e91/  

Val Hall – university of Brighton

Dave Taylor – Imperial College London

Suzanne Conboy-Hill – Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust & university of Brighton